JUST ACCEPTED: “JNPT Congratulates the Winners of the Neurology Section Awards”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“JNPT Congratulates the Winners of the Neurology Section Awards”
By
Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Provisional Abstract:

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JUST ACCEPTED: “Thank You to JNPT 2015 Reviewers”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“Thank You to JNPT 2015 Reviewers”
By
Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Provisional Abstract:

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JUST ACCEPTED: “JNPT Thanks Retiring Associate Editor Lee Dibble, PT, PhD AND JNPT Welcomes New Editorial Board Members Birgitta Langhammer, PT, PhD and Daniel Peterson, PhD”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“JNPT Thanks Retiring Associate Editor Lee Dibble, PT, PhD AND JNPT Welcomes New Editorial Board Members Birgitta Langhammer, PT, PhD and Daniel Peterson, PhD”
By
Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Provisional Abstract:

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JUST ACCEPTED: “Abstracts of Current Knowledge Translation Research Literature”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“Abstracts of Current Knowledge Translation Research Literature”
By
Edelle Field-Fote, PT, PhD, FAPTA

Provisional Abstract:

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JUST ACCEPTED: “Knowledge Translation: The Catalyst for Innovation of Neurologic Physical Therapy”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“Knowledge Translation: The Catalyst for Innovation of Neurologic Physical Therapy”
By
Vanessa K Noonan, PT, PhD; Jennifer L Moore, PT, DHS, NCS

Provisional Abstract:

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JUST ACCEPTED: “A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT IN BALANCE AND VESTIBULAR REHABILITATION AND ITS EFFECT ON CLINICAL OUTCOME MEASURES”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROJECT IN BALANCE AND VESTIBULAR REHABILITATION AND ITS EFFECT ON CLINICAL OUTCOME MEASURES”
By
Mohammad A. ALMohiza, Ph.D., PT; Patrick J. Sparto, PhD, PT; Gregory F. Marchetti, PhD, PT; Anthony Delitto, PhD, PT, FAPTA; Joseph M. Furman, MD, PhD; Debora L. Miller, PT, MBA; Susan L. Whitney, PhD, PT, NCS, ATC

Provisional Abstract:
Purpose/Hypothesis: Variation in practice is one of the leading causes of sub-optimal outcomes in healthcare which can be minimized via quality improvement initiatives. However, quality improvement projects focus mostly on assessing the processes and less attention is given to their effect on clinical outcomes. An effective implementation of a clinical treatment algorithm (CTA) could improve care for individuals with balance and vestibular disorders. The first aim of this quality improvement project was to examine compliance and adherence to a CTA developed by physical therapists who treat persons with balance and vestibular disorders. The second aim of this project was to examine the effect of adherence on patient outcomes.

Materials/Methods: Twenty-three physical therapists who provided rehabilitation for individuals with balance and vestibular disorders participated in the quality improvement project that lasted 16 weeks. All physical therapists worked for the same health care provider, and developed the minimum data set (MDS) and CTA. The physical therapists were cluster randomized into two groups; both groups received educational training and reminders regarding and adherence to the CTA. The first group received the training and reminders after an eight week baseline period (Initial Group), and the second group (Delayed Group) after a 12 week baseline period. The prescribed interventions were classified as being adherent or non-adherent to the CTA. Clinical outcomes, including the Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale (ABC), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), and the Global Rating of Change (GRC), were recorded at the initial evaluation and discharge for 454 individuals.

Results: Across the 16 week project, adherence rates improved significantly by 9 and 12% for the Initial and Delayed groups, respectively (p=0.008), but there was no difference between groups due to the timing of the educational training and adherence reminders. Clinical outcomes improved significantly for individuals, but there was no significant difference in change in ABC, DHI, and GRC scores according to if the interventions were adherent to the CTA.

Conclusions: This quality improvement project was effective in increasing the adherence to the CTA in both groups. Although on average individuals with balance and vestibular disorders showed improvement on the clinical outcomes, there was no additional benefit in the clinical outcome for adherent interventions.

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JUST ACCEPTED: “A New Framework and Practice Center for Adapting, Translating and Scaling Evidence-Based Health/Wellness Programs for People with Newly Acquired and Existing Disability”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“A New Framework and Practice Center for Adapting, Translating and Scaling Evidence-Based Health/Wellness Programs for People with Newly Acquired and Existing Disability”
By
James Rimmer, Ph.D; Kerri A Vanderbom, PhD; Ian D Graham, PhD, FCAHS

Provisional Abstract:
Background. Supporting the transition of people with newly acquired and existing disability from rehabilitation into community-based health/wellness programs, services and venues requires health care professionals to build the evidence by capturing successful strategies at the local level, finding innovative ways to translate successful practices to other communities across the U.S., and ultimately to upgrade and maintain their applicability and currency for future scale up.

Purpose. This paper describes a knowledge-to-practice framework housed in a national resource and practice center that will support therapists and other rehabilitation professionals in building and maintaining a database of successful health/wellness guidelines, recommendations and adaptations to promote community health inclusion for people with disabilities.

Methods. A framework was developed in the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) to systematically build and advance the evidence base of health/wellness programs, practices and services applicable to people with disabilities. N-KATS (NCHPAD Knowledge Adaptation, Translation, and Scale up) has four sequencing strategies: Strategy 1: New evidence- and practice-based knowledge is collected and adapted for the local context (i.e., community); Strategy 2: Customized resources are effectively disseminated to key stakeholders including physical therapists and other rehabilitation professionals with appropriate training tools; Strategy 3: NCHPAD staff serve as facilitators assisting key stakeholders in implementing recommendations; Strategy 4: Successful elements of practice (e.g., guideline, recommendation, adaptation) are archived and scaled to other therapists and rehabilitation providers.

Results & Conclusion. The N-KATS framework supports the role of rehabilitation professionals as knowledge brokers, facilitators and users in a collaborative, dynamic structure that will grow and be sustained over time through the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD).

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JUST ACCEPTED: “Use of tablet computers to promote physical therapy students’ engagement in knowledge translation during clinical experiences”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“Use of tablet computers to promote physical therapy students’ engagement in knowledge translation during clinical experiences”
By
Julie K Tilson, PT, MS, DPT, NCS; Kathryn Loeb, PT, DPT; Sabrina A Barbosa, PT, DPT; Fei Jiang, PT, DPT; Karin T Lee, PT, DPT, OCS

Provisional Abstract:
Background and Purpose: Physical therapists have struggled to integrate research into daily practice. The tablet computer is a potentially transformational tool for accessing information within the clinical practice environment. The purpose of this study was to measure and describe patterns of tablet computer use among physical therapy students during clinical rotation experiences.

Methods: Doctor of physical therapy students (n=13 users) tracked their use of iPad tablet computers, loaded with commercially available apps, during 16 clinical experiences (6-16 weeks in duration).

Results: The tablets were used on 70% of 691 clinic days, averaging 1.3 uses per day. Information seeking represented 48% of uses; 33% of those were foreground searches for research articles and syntheses and 66% were for background medical information. Other common uses included patient education (19%), medical record documentation (13%), and professional communication (9%). The most frequently used app was Safari, the preloaded web browser [281 (36.5%) uses]. Users accessed 56 total apps to support clinical practice.

Discussion and Conclusions: Physical therapy students successfully integrated use of a tablet computer into their clinical experiences including regular activities of information seeking. Our findings suggest that the tablet computer represents a potentially transformational tool for promoting knowledge translation in the clinical practice environment.

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JUST ACCEPTED: “The role domains of knowledge brokering: A model for the healthcare setting”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“The role domains of knowledge brokering: A model for the healthcare setting”
By
Stephanie Miranda Nadine Glegg, MSc; Alison Hoens

Provisional Abstract:
Knowledge brokering is a strategy to support collaborations and partnerships within and across clinical, research and policy worlds to improve the generation and use of research knowledge. Knowledge brokers (KBs) function in multiple roles to facilitate the use of evidence by leveraging the power of these partnerships. The application of theory can provide clarity in understanding the processes, influences, expected mechanisms of action and desired outcomes of knowledge brokering. Viewing knowledge brokering from the perspective of its role domains can provide a means of organizing these elements to advance our understanding of knowledge brokering. The objectives of this paper are: 1) to describe the context for knowledge brokering in healthcare, 2) to provide an overview of knowledge translation theories applied to knowledge brokering, and 3) to propose a model outlining the role domains assumed in knowledge brokering. The Role Model for Knowledge Brokering is comprised of five role domains, including information manager, linking agent, capacity builder, facilitator and evaluator. We provide examples from the literature and our real-world experience to demonstrate the application of the model. This model can be used to inform the practice of knowledge brokering as well as professional development and evaluation strategies. In addition, it may be used to inform theory-driven research examining the effectiveness of knowledge brokering on knowledge generation and translation outcomes in the healthcare field, as well as on patient health outcomes.
Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Supplemental Digital Content 1).

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JUST ACCEPTED: “Development of a Theory-Based Intervention to Increase Clinical Measurement of Reactive Balance in Adults at Risk of Falls: A Case Report”

The following article has just been accepted for publication in Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy:

“Development of a Theory-Based Intervention to Increase Clinical Measurement of Reactive Balance in Adults at Risk of Falls: A Case Report”
By
Kathryn May Sibley, PhD; Dina Brooks; Paula Gardner; Tania Janaudis-Ferreira; Mandy McGlynn; Sachi O’Hoski; Sara McEwan; Nancy M Salbach; Jennifer Shaffer; Paula Shing; Sharon E Straus; Susan B Jaglal

Provisional Abstract:
Background: Effective balance reactions are essential for avoiding falls, but are not regularly measured by physiotherapists. Physiotherapists report wanting to improve reactive balance assessment, and theoretically-informed approaches are recommended to develop interventions. This paper describes how a behavior change theory for healthcare providers, the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF), was used to develop an intervention to increase reactive balance measurement among physiotherapists who work in rehabilitation settings and treat adults who are at risk of falls.

Case Description: Published recommendations for using the TDF guided intervention development, considering what healthcare provider behavior needs to change; relevant barriers and facilitators; strategies to address them; and how to measure behavior change. In this case, identifying strategies required selecting both a reactive balance measure and behavior change techniques.

Outcomes: Previous research had determined that physiotherapists need to increase reactive balance measurement, and identified barriers and facilitators that corresponded to eight TDF domains. A published review informed the selection of the Balance Evaluation Systems Test (Reactive Postural Responses Section) as addressing the barriers and facilitators, and existing research informed the selection of nine established behavior change techniques corresponding to each identified TDF domain. These were incorporated into a 12-month intervention with interactive group sessions, local champions, and health record modifications. Intervention effect can be evaluated using chart abstraction, questionnaires and qualitative semi-structured interviews.

Conclusions: While future research will evaluate the intervention in a controlled study, the process of theory-based intervention development can be applied to other rehabilitation research contexts, maximizing the impact of this work.

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